The Motion of the Sun & Sunrise and Sunset (North and South)

We see airplanes apparently ascending and descending in a straight line even though they are flying at a constant altitude over a flat surface. The reason why they appear to be ascending when approaching and descending when receding is because their light body is bent downwards, which we already know to be the division of light mentioned in Genesis 1 : 3-4. We are not looking at the airplane itself, but receive all visual information via the fabric of the light body of the airplane. As the light body passes by, the point of convergence shifts downwards, which creates the optical illusion of the airplane describing a straight descent. The same universal principle of a shifting of the point of convergence within the fabric of the light body is present in all of our observations, including in the motion of the stars and celestial bodies. The Sun, Moon, planets, and stars are continuously running from east to west in a straight line. The domains of the elements act as a continuum which has no perceptible ends and corners. Arriving at one end, one appears on the other end (assuming a horizontal motion). This principle is applicable to objects and their light bodies.

 The light body of the Sun is bent sideways and intersects the Foundations of Heaven. It is, therefore, bent twice, downwards, towards the Foundations of the Earth; and sideways, towards one of the Foundations of Heaven. As the light body of the Sun passes by from east to west, it appears as if the Sun were describing a circular path, since the point of convergence is shifting downwards and sideways, which makes the Sun appear to be encircling a celestial pole located over latitude 90°.

‚ÄčThe Earth was designed to resemble a sphere, just like we know it from the official round Earth model. The way the light body works creates a nearly perfect illusion of being on a sphere with the Sun, Moon, and stars encircling two celestial poles.

Picture above illustrates the observable path of the Sun and the physical. The circle represents the observable path. The observer is located on the longitude 0°. As the Sun proceeds its physical motion from east to west in a straight line, the observer visualizes the Sun describing a circular path encircling the northern celestial pole since the light body of the Sun is bent towards the northern Foundation of Heaven.
 

As the Sun moves on in a straight line, the observable Sun commences its apparent circular motion. The apparent circular path corresponds to the physical cycle of 40 075 kilometers. 

The Sun has completed one half of its cycle, namely 20 000 kilometers, and is at its farthest point. Accordingly, the observable Sun has completed one half of its circuit. Note that the full circuit of the Sun can only be observed in continuous daylight areas. The 24 hours sun can be observed in the far north as it is covered by the Sun's light body over the entire cycle. For observers further south, the Sun appears to rise and set.

 The physical path of the Sun is almost completed, and the observable circuit is also almost completed.

Both, the physical and the observable cycle of the Sun are completed for the observer standing on the  longitude 0.
 

Sunset and Sunrise

In picture above, we have marked five vantage points along the longitude 0°, with the vantage point 1 being the most southern, and the vantage point 5 being the most northern.  Pay attention to the timeline below which shows the location of the Sun according to the universal time chart. The picture shows the Sun's position at 12 o'clock. 12 o'clock also marks the middle of the Earth, namely the longitude 0°. Note that the observable path is not horizontal as illustrated in the pictures, but it's also subjected to a rising and setting.
 

The light body of the Sun moves from east to west. At about 15:45 universal time, the observer at vantage point 1 is the first to see the Sun disappear below the horizon. The yellow arrow shows the approximate direction of the sunset for VP1, which is in the north-west. 

The next to see the Sun set is the observer at vantage point 2. For VP2, the Sun sets in the north-west at 17:45 universal time.
 

At about 18:45, the Sun sets for observer at VP3, it sets in the north-west.
 

 It's 21:40. Sunset for VP 4. The Sun sets in the north-west.
 

The observer at vantage point 5 can see the Sun for 24 hours because he remains within the light body of the Sun throughout the entire cycle.
 

Now it's time for sunrise. At approximately 2:20 o'clock universal time, the Sun rises for the observer at vantage point 4. As the yellow arrow shows, the Sun rises in the north-east.
 

At about 5:20 o'clock, the Sun rises for the observer at vantage point 3. It rises in the north-east.
 

At about 6:30, the Sun rises for vantage point 2. It is seen rising in the north-east.
 

The observer at vantage point 1 is the last to see the Sun rise at about 8 o'clock. It rises in the north-east. During the summer months, the days are longer in the North than in the South. The opposite happens during the winter months, when days in the North are shorter than in the South. The illustration shows the position of the Sun, and the outlines of the day light zone for June 21. As we see in the picture above, the day length decreases the further south, and increases the further north.  At certain latitudes, the day becomes twenty four hours (VP5)
 

For a full understanding we are going to elaborate the motion of the Sun in the South as well.

We are going to review the sunsets and sunrises from 5 different vantage points along the longitude 0°. It's a well known fact that the motion of the Sun is counter-clockwise during the winter months (when seen from above), and clockwise during the summer, exactly as we would observe it on a sphere because our observable astronomy is designed after a spherical layout. The position of the Sun changes throughout the year as the Sun wanders north and south. During the wandering between the North and the South, the Sun's light body flips from one Foundation of Heaven to the other. It is not due to a tilt of the flying and spinning spherical Earth, even though it may be easily confused with a physical tilt of a physically spherical Earth since the mathematics, as well as the observable astronomy, match in both cases. 

For the observer at VP5, the Sun sets at about 15:45 UTC, in the south-west. 
  

Being further south, the vantage point 4 has a longer day than VP5. VP4 sees the Sun set at about 17:20 UTC. It sets in the south-west.

At about 18:40 universal time,  the Sun sets for the observer at vantage point 3. It sets in the south-west. 

At 21:30 the Sun sets for vantage point 2. It sets in the south-west.
 

Now it's time for sunrise for the longitude 0°. The first to see the Sun rise is the vantage point 2. The Sun rises at 2:30 universal time. It rises in the south-east.
 

5:30 UTC. The Sun rises for vantage point 3 - in the south-east. 

6:30 UTC. Sunrise for vantage point 4. The sunrise is observed in the south-east. 

And finally, at 8:00 o'clock UTC - sunrise for vantage point 5. The sunrise is observed in the south-east.