Object approaching another object

The red sphere represents an object. The “canopy” represent the light body. Every atom in the universe, regardless of the element, has a light body that stretches out in all directions away from the atom. In addition, the light body is bent downwards and intersects the surface thus creating a circle of intersection, also known as horizon line. Our entire perspective and the way we visualize reality is based on the principle of  interaction between light bodies. 
 
 

1

The eyes of the observer, like all objects, have a light body. The following image illustrates two observers represented by a blue ball and a red ball. The circle of intersection between the light body and the surface is perceived as the horizon line. At this point, both observers do not see each other, as their light bodies are not intersecting. Everything within the light body of the observers is perceived in front of the horizon line, while everything outside of the light body is perceived behind the horizon line. The area marked by the circle of intersection represents the circle of sight.
 

2

The blue ball continues to approach the red ball.  At some point, the light body of the blue ball intersects the light body of the red ball. As soon as their light bodies intersect, the blue ball appears on the horizon of the red ball, but is still perceived behind the horizon line, as it has not yet crossed the circle of intersection of the red ball. The blue ball appears top first on the horizon and appears to be ascending as he continues to approach. Both, the red and the blue ball visualize each other behind their horizon line. 
 

3

As the blue ball continues to approach, he crosses the circle of intersection, or the horizon line, of the red ball and enters the circle of sight of the red ball. At this point, the blue ball is entirely visible, from top to bottom. Both balls are same altitude and their circles of sight have the same circumference. As the blue ball crosses the circle of sight of the red ball, the red ball also enters the circle of sight of the blue ball and becomes entirely visible for the blue ball. At this point, both are within each others' circle of sight and are fully visible to each other.

4

The two spheres visualize each other from close distance. 

5

 The two spheres align and their circles of sight overlap.
 

6

The blue sphere moves on. From the perspective of the red sphere, the blue sphere appears to be descending in a straight line, towards the horizon line, but remains entirely visible as long as it is within the circle of sight of the red sphere.
 

7

As  the blue  sphere  continues his motion, he crosses the circle  of sight  of  the red   sphere and begins to dip below horizon, bottom first, but remains visible as long as their light bodies are intersecting. 

8

The circle of sight of the blue sphere is almost completely disconnected from the circle of sight of the red ball. At this point, the upper part of the blue sphere is  still visible, while the lower part has “disappeared” below the horizon line of the red ball.

9

As the circles of sight disconnect, the two observers entirely “disappear “ from each others' field of view. The red ball is now entirely below the horizon line of the blue ball and vice versa.

...as seen by the red sphere